Quick Contact

    CSS Syntax

    Introduction

    A CSS stylesheet is a collection of guidelines that are translated by the internet browser and then implemented to the document’s corresponding pixels such as paragraphs, headings, and so on.

    CSS is a styling language which is used to alter the visual effect of a document created in a markup language such as HTML by modifying elements such as color combinations, placement, and decorations.

    The following are the fundamental building blocks of CSS syntax:

    1. property:

      A property is an unique identification that designates which characteristic, such as colour or font size, is considered.

    2. CSS values:

      CSS values are assigned to CSS Properties and saved in the CSS declaration block, which is a component of the CSS rule/statement. The colour, for example, is set to black.

    CSS values are assigned to the properties in the property value pair, separated by a COLON (**’: ‘**).

    Property: value;

    A property and value pair is called a declaration.

    CSS selector

    A CSS selector is the first element of a CSS syntax rule. It’s a set of HTML elements that informs the browser which Html documents should have the CSS property prices of the principle implemented to them.

    Now we’re in a position to define the structure of a CSS statement, which appears like this:

    Selector { property : value; }

    The statements inside the block, on the other hand, determine how the elements are structured on a webpage. So every declaration is made up of a property as well as a valuation separate by a colon (:) and completing with a semicolon (;), and the confirmation gatherings are kept separate by curly braces {}.

    The property is the style characteristic that you want to modify; it could be font, colour, background, or something else. Each feature has a value, such as colour, which can be either blue or #0000FF.

    h1 {color:blue; text-align:center;}

    Example

    < !DOCTYPE html>
    < html lang="en">
    < head>
    < meta charset="utf-8">
    < title>Example of CSS syntax< /title>
    < style>
        h1 {
    color: blue;
    text-align: center;
        }
    < /style>
    < /head>
    < body>
    < h1>Here is the heading< /h1>
    < /body>
    < /html>
    

    Output

    In the preceding example, h1 is a selector, colour and text-align are CSS characteristics, and the given blue and centre are their corresponding values.

    Note:
    A CSS declaration is always followed by a semicolon “;,” and declaration groups are always enclosed by curly brackets “{}”.

    Comments in CSS

    Comments are typically added to make the source code more understandable. It may aid another developer (or you in the future once users edit the source code) in understanding what you were attempting to accomplish with CSS. Browsers completely disregard comments, which are important to programmers.

    As shown in the example below, a CSS comment begins with /* and ends with */.

    Example

    < !DOCTYPE html>
    < html lang="en">
    < head>
    < meta charset="utf-8">
    < title>Example of CSS comments< /title>
    < style>
        /* This is a CSS comment */
    	/* Comments are not displayed,
    by the browser */
        h1 {
    color: orange;
    text-align: center;
        }
    < /style>
    < /head>
    < body>
    < h1>This is a heading< /h1>
    < /body>
    < /html>
    

    Output

    You can also troubleshoot the CSS code by commenting out sections of it, as shown here:

    Example

    < !DOCTYPE html>
    < html lang="en">
    < head>
    < meta charset="utf-8">
    < title>Example of Commenting Code in CSS< /title>
    < style>
        h1 {
    color: orange;
    text-align: center;
        }
        /*
    p {
    font-size: 18px;
    text-transform: uppercase;
        }
        */
    < /style>
    < /head>
    < body>
    < h1>This is a heading< /h1>
    < p>This is a paragraph of text.< /p>
    < /body>
    < /html>
    

    Output

    Case Sensitivity in CSS

    Many CSS property names and principles are case-insensitive. CSS selectors, on the other hand, are generally case-sensitive; for example, the class selector.maincontent is not the same as.mainContent.

    To be on the safe side, suppose that all elements of CSS rules are case-sensitive.

    FAQS

    Q1. What is the CSS syntax?

    A CSS Syntax rule is made up of a selector, a possessions, and a valuation. The selector identifies the HTML element to which CSS styling will be implemented. Semicolons distinguish the CSS properties. It is a combination of the controller name and the property: value pair that has been defined for the particular selector.

    Q2. What is CSS rule?

    A CSS rule is a collection of one or more CSS properties that apply to one or more target HTML elements. A CSS rule is made up of a CSS selector and a collection of CSS properties. The CSS selector specifies which HTML elements should be targeted by the CSS rule.

    Q3. What is the structure of CSS?

    CSS is made up of two parts at its most basic: Properties are human-readable identifiers that specify which stylistic features you want to change. For instance, font-size, width, and background-color. Values: A value is assigned to each property.

    Q4. What is the common syntax for the classes in CSS?

    A class identifier in CSS is configured as a period (.) character accompanied by the class name. It needs to select all components with that class label so that detailed CSS statements can be implemented to those elements while not impacting other components of the page.

    Copyright 1999- Ducat Creative, All rights reserved.

    Anda bisa mendapatkan server slot online resmi dan terpercaya tentu saja di sini. Sebagai salah satu provider yang menyediakan banyak pilihan permainan.